sunlightcities:

More Friday city fun: local Starbucks data! 

sunlightcities:

More Friday city fun: local Starbucks data! 

Reblogged from sunlightcities

rinotino:

Screenshot of the new website I’ve launched:

The Data Visualisation Catalogue

Reblogged from rinotino

INTERACTIVE ESSAY: The Next America →

unionmetrics:

pewresearch:

Get to know the America of tomorrow in this amazing interactive piece from Pew. 

Reblogged from pewresearch

Reblogged from sameerpadania

vizual-statistix:

For those heading to Las Vegas hoping to win vast amounts of money, use this graphic as a friendly reminder that things probably won’t work out in your favor. That said, if you want to lose a smaller percentage of your money, the scatter plot suggests you should stick with the data points hovering near the x-axis.
Your best bet is the $100 slot machines, where the casinos take only 3.6% of your money! Of course, you’ll need a hefty stack of Benjamins if you want to play for more than a couple minutes. And if you are concerned about the magnitude of money lost rather than the percentage, you may want to move over to the penny slots, where you’ll still lose only 11.8%.
If you’re a sports fan, betting on baseball will give you slightly better odds than basketball and football. You’re much less likely to lose your money betting on those sports than on racing.
If you like heading to the tables, bingo is the game-o. The house only takes in 8.8% of the wagers there, followed by blackjack (11.1%). Stay away from 3-card poker, where gamblers lose an average of 32.5% of their money.
The weekly average values in this graphic were derived from one year of data for all non-restricted locations in the Las Vegas Strip area.
Data source: http://gaming.nv.gov/index.aspx?page=149 (12-month summary of Feb 2014 pdf).

vizual-statistix:

For those heading to Las Vegas hoping to win vast amounts of money, use this graphic as a friendly reminder that things probably won’t work out in your favor. That said, if you want to lose a smaller percentage of your money, the scatter plot suggests you should stick with the data points hovering near the x-axis.

Your best bet is the $100 slot machines, where the casinos take only 3.6% of your money! Of course, you’ll need a hefty stack of Benjamins if you want to play for more than a couple minutes. And if you are concerned about the magnitude of money lost rather than the percentage, you may want to move over to the penny slots, where you’ll still lose only 11.8%.

If you’re a sports fan, betting on baseball will give you slightly better odds than basketball and football. You’re much less likely to lose your money betting on those sports than on racing.

If you like heading to the tables, bingo is the game-o. The house only takes in 8.8% of the wagers there, followed by blackjack (11.1%). Stay away from 3-card poker, where gamblers lose an average of 32.5% of their money.

The weekly average values in this graphic were derived from one year of data for all non-restricted locations in the Las Vegas Strip area.

Data source: http://gaming.nv.gov/index.aspx?page=149 (12-month summary of Feb 2014 pdf).

Reblogged from vizual-statistix

In the end, I discovered something that everyone in business eventually realizes: Analysis is easy enough; decision-making is hard. You have to incorporate factors that seem very far removed from the technical problem at hand. “How do we sell more cars?” can’t be answered simply with a good mission statement and great advertising executions. You have to factor in how your various constituencies (distributors, dealers, salespeople) will relate to the agency and its people; you have to factor in whether you, the client, can develop relationships yourself with people in the agency whom you hope will become trusted advisors. You have to ask whether the agency and the campaign will generate such enthusiasm down the ranks of your company that it will prompt people to go the extra mile to sell more product.

— Randall Rothenberg. President & CEO. Interactive Advertising Bureau. The Agency Review. (via marketing-nerds)

(Source: peterspear)

Reblogged from peterspear

I’ve always been very interested in loving things that required defense.

— Hot 97’s Peter Rosenberg talks about his relationship with hip-hop in our new short. (via wnycradiolab)

Fantastic episode.

Reblogged from wnycradiolab

peterspear:

“The Generations Defined" Pew.

Not an endorsement for throwing these terms around as if they describe real things. They are as much brands without a product as anything else.

peterspear:

The Generations Defined" Pew.

Not an endorsement for throwing these terms around as if they describe real things. They are as much brands without a product as anything else.

Reblogged from peterspear

futurejournalismproject:

Average Time US Millennials Spend Interacting with Media Per Day
Eighteen hours? It’s all about multitasking. Via the Wall Street Journal.

futurejournalismproject:

Average Time US Millennials Spend Interacting with Media Per Day

Eighteen hours? It’s all about multitasking. Via the Wall Street Journal.

Reblogged from haberdashmen